Company Formation Service

Having chosen Ireland as the location for your new limited company, what follows are the practical steps that you will need to follow to get your company set up and ready for use.



  • Choose your proposed company name

    Your chosen company name must be one which is not already in use by another company and also which is sufficiently unique and distinguishable from other existing companies. If your chosen company name is too similar to an existing company, it will be rejected by the Companies Registration Office (CRO). There are also a few other restrictions on the name that you can give to your company. You can search to see if your chosen company name is already in use at www.cro.ie

  • Choose the registered office address

    All Irish companies are required to have a registered office address in Ireland. This is the official address for the business where all official documents are served. This address does not have to be the address from where the business trades but it must be a physical address located in Ireland. PO Box addresses are not permitted.

  • Choose the company directors

    Under current legislation there must be a minimum of one company director and a company secretary. It is a legal requirement that at least one of the Director must be resident in the EU. Where it is not possible to appoint a director who is resident in the EU, you can instead put in place a type of insurance policy known as a Non Resident Director Bond.

  • Choose the company secretary

    Every limited company is required to appoint a company secretary. It is acceptable (and indeed common) for one of the directors to also act as the company secretary. There are no minimum qualification requirements for a company secretary of a private limited company (unlike a public limited company). Another limited company can also be appointed as a company secretary.

  • Choose the shareholders

    Shareholders are the owners of the company. In Ireland there is no restriction in relation to foreign ownership of companies. An Irish company can be 100% owned by non-Irish residents.

  • Company Formation

    After you have decided on your basic company details above, you are ready to form your limited company. In order to form your limited company you will need to draft and sign a Form A1 and the company’s Memorandum and Articles of Association or Constitution agreement. We will prepare both of these for you. The documents required for signing will be sent to you via email or post depending on your preference. Once the original signed documents have been returned to us, your new limited company will be incorporated within 3 – 5 working days.

  • Tax Registration

    After your company has been formed, the next step is to register the company with the Irish tax authorities, the Revenue Commissioners, known as “Revenue”.

    It is generally straight forward to obtain a corporation tax registration. However it is important to be aware that registering for VAT can be more difficult. Revenue conduct more checks before registering a company for VAT in Ireland. It is therefore essential to ensure that your initial application for a VAT number is correct. If there are errors or inconsistencies in your initial application, it can make it more difficult to successfully obtain a VAT registration. In order to be successfully registered for VAT, your company must demonstrate real links to Ireland and show that there is some substance of your business activity in Ireland. We can assist you with opening a bank account in Ireland. It is important to be aware that the banks will require several documents from non-residents who are seeking to open a bank account.

    The exact identification requirements vary from bank to bank depending on their own internal procedures. However you should expect to be asked for copies of your passport/national identity documents, proof of address documents and possibly a reference from your own bank in your own country. All of these documents will usually need to be certified either by your own bank or by a solicitor or other specified individuals.

  • Conclusion

    The above outlines the main steps that you will have to follow to get your limited company set up and ready to fully operate in Ireland

A Company in General

A company is a legal form of business organisation. It is a separate legal entity and, therefore, is separate and distinct from those who run it. The company (and not the individual shareholders) is the appropriate person to be sued in the event that debts are incurred by the company which remain unpaid, despite demand.

Form A1 is completed and submitted together with a constitution (Only a one document constitution if the company is a LTD company, a memorandum and articles of association for all other company types).

There are a number of company types:

Limited company

The shares in a company are owned by its shareholders. If the company is a limited liability company, the shareholders' liability, should the company fail, is limited to the amount, if any, remaining unpaid on the shares held by them. A company is a separate legal entity and, therefore, is separate and distinct from those who run it. Only the company can be sued for its obligations and can sue to enforce its rights.

There are several types of limited company:

  1. A Private Company Limited by Shares (LTD company): The members' liability, if the company is wound up, is limited to the amount, if any, unpaid on the shares they hold. The maximum number of members is 149. An LTD company can have only one director if it chooses. An LTD company does not have stated objects and can undertake any activity. Part 2 of the Companies Act 2014 refers.
  2. A Designated Activity Company (DAC) :(limited by shares). The members' liability, if the company is wound up, is limited to the amount, if any, unpaid on the shares they hold. The maximum number of members is 149. A DAC company must have at least 2 directors. Constitution includes a memorandum and articles of association. The memorandum will include stated objects. Part 16 of the Companies Act 2014 refers.
  3. A Designated Activity Company Limited by Guarantee (DAC) :(limited by guarantee). The members have liability under two headings; firstly, the amount, if any, that is unpaid on the shares they hold, and secondly, the amount they have undertaken to contribute to the assets of the company, in the event that it is wound up. The maximum number of members is 149. A DAC company must have at least 2 directors. Constitution includes a memorandum and articles of association. The memorandum will include stated objects. Part 16 of the Companies Act 2014 refers.
  4. A Company Limited by Guarantee (CLG) :(limited by guarantee not having a share capital): The members' liability is limited to the amount they have undertaken to contribute to the assets of the company, in the event it is wound up, not exceeding the amount specified in the memorandum. As a guarantee company does not have a share capital, the members are not required to buy any shares in the company. Many charitable and professional bodies find this form of company to be a suitable vehicle as they wish to secure the benefits of separate legal personality and of limited liability but do not require to raise funds from the members. Part 18 of the Companies Act 2014 refers.
  5. A Public Limited Company (PLC):The liability of members is limited to the amount, if any, unpaid on shares held by them. It should be noted that it is unlawful to issue any form of prospectus except in compliance with the Companies Act 2014. The nominal value of the company's allotted share capital must not be less than €25,000, at least 25% of which must be fully paid up before the company commences business or exercises any borrowing powers. (s.1010) Part 17 of the Companies Act 2014 refers.
Single Member Company

A single member company is a company which is incorporated with one member, or whose membership is reduced to one person. However, the company must have at least two directors and a secretary. (unless it is a LTD company, which can also be a single director company). The sole member, if he/she so decides, can dispense with the holding of General Meetings, including Annual General Meetings (AGMs). The financial statements and reports that would normally be laid before the AGM of a company still need to be prepared and forwarded to the member. All company types can be single member companies.

Unlimited company

In an unlimited company, there is no limit placed on the liability of the members. Recourse may be had by creditors to the shareholders in respect of any liabilities owed by the company which the company has failed to discharge. An unlimited company can be either public or private.